Friday, March 23, 2012

New EISF Report on Incident Statistics

The European Interagency Security Forum (EISF) has a new report out, titled Incident Statistics in Aid Worker Safety and Security Management: Using and Producing Them. It's written by Koenraad van Brabant and you can download it here.

Want to know more before getting it? Here's an excerpt from the official description:

Over the past decade we have seen the increased circulation of safety and security incident-related numbers and statistics. Incident statistics on safety and security are useful tools for organisations to provide them with information on the changing nature of threats, how incidents impact their organisation and how well they are managing the risks to which they are exposed. However, many organisations have difficulties with obtaining accurate and reliable incident information to enable statistics to be developed.

The huge variety of numbers and statistics that come to us from different sources, and the different pictures they seem to paint, have become quite bewildering. The purpose of this article is to provide guidance on how to use and produce incident statistics and analysis, by considering three questions:
  1. Why are incident statistics on safety and security important for aid organisations?
  2. What should aid organisations keep in mind when considering and comparing different statistics?
  3. Can aid agencies produce and contribute to relevant and good statistics and if so, how?
Practical guidance is provided in the annexes on how to develop an organisational incident reporting system. Examples of different categories of incident statistics are provided throughout the text.

I've personally been very impressed with the caliber of research and publications that are coming out of EISF. Their Web site is well worth checking on a regular basis.


Sunday, March 04, 2012

PSEA Web Site

The Inter-Agency Standing Committee (IASC) Task Force on Preventing Sexual Exploitation and Abuse (PSEA) has a new Web site. Anyone in an NGO managerial capacity, especially those responsible for safety and security, should have basic knowledge about PSEA. This site is a good starting point.